2020 Martin Luther King Jr Holiday Lock Desk Hours

Overview

The Lock Desk at Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC (CMS) will be closed on Monday, January 20, 2020 for Martin Luther King Jr. Day, which is a Federal Holiday. Normal lock hours will resume on Tuesday, January 21, 2020.

Rate Locks that expire on the holiday will automatically roll to the next business day.  In addition there are some important disclosure considerations associated with the holiday:

  • Monday January 20, 2020 cannot be included in the rescission period for refinance transactions.
  • Monday January 20, 2020 cannot be included in the seven (7) business day waiting period between the between the date the initial Loan Estimate (LE) was provided to the borrower and the consummation of the loan.
  • When re-disclosure of the LE is required, Monday January 20, 2020 cannot be included in the three (3) day business waiting period between the date the revised LE was provided to the borrower and the consummation of the loan.
  • When re-disclosure of the CD is required, Monday January 20, 2020 cannot be included in the three (3) business day waiting period between the date the revised CD was provided to the borrower and the consummation of the loan.

Issues related to locks should be sent via email to lockdesk@carringtonms.com.

The Good News Flow Continues

Last Week in Review: The Good News Flow Continues

This past week, we watched home loan rates tick modestly higher and retreat from three-year lows.

Why?

There are three main reasons:

  1. U.S and Iran. On Wednesday, the de-escalation of tensions between the U.S. and Iran brought an immediate sense of calm to the financial markets. As a result, Stocks traded to all-time highs at the expense of Bonds and home loan rates.
  2. Jobs, jobs, jobs. Both the ADP and Jobs Report showed continued health in the labor market. The positive data is good news for the economy and good news for housing. Bonds hate good news, so rates ticked up.
  3. Improvement in Europe. Germany reported surprisingly stronger economic data, suggesting their economy is on the mend. In response to the good news, German rates ticked higher this week while putting upward pressure on our rates.

Bottom line: home loan rates are within a whisker of the best in three years and near the lowest in the history of our country. Coupled with a strong consumer and housing backdrop, this makes it an incredible time to either purchase or refinance a home.

New Year, New Decade, Same Story

Last Week in Review: Nice Start to 2020

The new year and new decade started, and good news, some things don’t change. Stocks picked up right where they left off in 2019 by touching all-time highs. And Bonds, which also performed well in 2019, continue to hover near three-year highs, keeping home loan rates near 3-year lows.

Many are wondering how the economy and markets will perform in 2020. So, for that reason, here are 3 trends to follow:

  1. Don’t fight the Fed. As the saying goes, there doesn’t appear to be any chance of a Fed rate hike in 2020. The economy is strong, but not too strong. Plus, the Fed is fighting disinflation, so a rate hike would counter those efforts. Moreover, it’s a presidential election year and the Fed has historically tried it’s best to avoid any monetary policy moves in those years. Bottom line: good for Stocks and less good for Bonds.
  2. Stock gains. Post-World War II, Stocks on average have gained 10.1% in presidential election years where the incumbent is up for re-election. It’s tough to fight that trend, even with Stocks soaring in 2019. Bottom line: Stocks are set to finish 2020 higher.
  3. $1,000,000,000,000. That was what the U.S. spent in holiday retail shopping in 2019. That massive record highlights the strength of the U.S. consumer who makes up 70% of the U.S. economy. Bottom line: there is no recession in sight, great news for housing and the overall economy.

Bottom line: absent of a Black Swan event or unforeseen negative surprise, 2020 is shaping up to be a great year for housing and the U.S. economy, with the labor market strong, wages rising, inflation muted, and interest rates low.

Finishing the Year With a Bang

Last Week in Review: Global Improvement

2019 was an incredible year for Stocks, which finished the final trading week of the year at all-time highs. Generally speaking, when Stocks go higher, so do rates. And that was the case this past week as home loan rates ticked up to the highest levels in months.

So, what was the reason for higher Stocks and higher rates?

Global financial improvement! 2019 was a “tug of war” year between central banks around the globe cutting rates and adding monetary stimulus, and economies attempting to avoid recession.

We are finishing the year with economies winning and showing improved growth and confidence heading into 2020.

What does this mean for rates in the near-term?

If countries around the globe continue to improve, their rates will continue to creep higher. If rates around the globe creep higher, so will ours.

The good news is that because inflation remains extremely low, we should not expect home loan rates to move too high anytime soon.

Bottom line: the U.S. has been and continues to be the global economic leader and moves into 2020 with a Goldilocks backdrop which includes a strong labor market, rising wages, low inflation, and low rates.

Four Tailwinds for Housing

Last Week in Review: Goldilocks 2.0

As we enter the final weeks of 2019, the housing and home lending sectors have enjoyed a good year thanks to a “Goldilocks” scenario of a tight labor market, rising wages, consumer confidence, and three-year low interest rates.

Many are asking “What should we expect for housing, and thus lending, as we enter 2020?” The answer: 2020 may even be better for both.

Tailwinds for Housing in 2020 include:

  1. Housing starts of single-family homes are expected to hit the 1M mark for the first time in 12 years. This should help add to much-needed inventory in many parts of the country.
  2. In the final Jobs Report for 2019, which was November, the unemployment rate ticked down to 3.5%, a 50+-year low, while we created a massive 266,000 new jobs. Jobs buy homes, not rates. This kind of labor market strength heading into 2020 should further boost the housing sector.
  3. The Fed is not likely going to cut or hike rates in 2020, unless new economic threats emerge – meaning short-term interest rates are not likely to move much, if at all.
  4. Inflation remains low. Inflation is the main driver of long-term rates like mortgage rates. In the absence of any unforeseen pickup in inflation, home loan rates should remain relatively close to current levels for the foreseeable future.

Bottom line: 2019 was a good year and the data suggests the good times should continue well into the spring of 2020 making it a historic opportunity to have both a strong economy and low rates.

Changes That Could Affect Rates

Last Week in Review: Changes That Could Affect Rates

There are rumors that our Fed is considering an idea to abandon its present 2% target rate for inflation in favor of a floating target where inflation would be allowed to rise above 2% for some time before considering hiking rates.

This comes with two consequences that mortgage lenders, Realtors, and would-be borrowers need to understand:

  1. If the Fed allows inflation to rise north of 2% before considering hiking rates, we are not likely to see a Fed rate hike anytime soon. This is because inflation is currently running at 1.6% and well beneath the Fed’s current target.
  2. If the Fed is successful in allowing inflation to rise, home loan rates will rise as well. Inflation is the main driver of long-term interest rates.

When the Fed says they want inflation to reach its 2% target, they are talking about the Core Personal Consumption Expenditure (PCE) year-over-year figure.

The Core PCE Index is typically delivered the third week of every month, and will be even more important to track should the Fed make changes to its current policy and decide to allow inflation to rise above its longstanding 2% target.

Bottom line: inflation currently remains tepid and is the major reason why long-term rates, like home loans, remain near three-year lows. If inflation rises, home loan rates will rise. The opposite is also true.

A Great Housing Backdrop

Last Week in Review: A Great Housing Backdrop

Many are wondering what lies ahead for housing as we enter 2020.

There are many reasons why the U.S. housing sector should do well for the foreseeable future, but here’s three main reasons for the bright outlook:

  1. Housing Starts are improving. This is especially true for single-family homes, which have risen for five consecutive months. This trend suggests anticipated buying demand.
  2. The labor market remains strong. Rates don’t buy homes, jobs do. 50+ year low unemployment at 3.6%, coupled with rising wages makes for a wonderful housing backdrop.
  3. Low home loan rates for longer than most expect. Rates don’t buy homes, but they definitely help more people participate in buying a home. With inflation running beneath the Fed target of 2.00% for the foreseeable future, there should be no upward pressure on home loan rates.

Bottom line: there is no recession in sight. The backdrop for housing is more of a Goldilocks scenario and makes for a wonderful time to purchase a home.

2019 Thanksgiving Holiday Lock Desk Hours

Overview

The Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC (CMS) Lock Desk, will be closed Thursday, November 28, 2019 in observance of Thanksgiving, which is a federal holiday.  Due to the holiday, the Lock Desk will be closing early on Friday, November 29, 2019 at 11:00 AM PST (early market closure of 2:00 PM EST).  Normal Lock Desk hours will resume on Monday, December 2, 2019.

Locks that expire on the holiday will automatically roll to the next business day.  In addition, there are some important disclosure considerations associated with the holiday:

  • Thursday, November 28, 2019 cannot be included in the rescission period for refinance transactions.
  • Thursday, November 28, 2019 cannot be included in the seven (7) business day waiting period between the date the initial Loan Estimate (LE) was provided to the borrower and the consummation of the loan
  • When re-disclosure of the LE is required, Thursday, November 28, 2019 cannot be included in the four (4) business day waiting period between the date the revised LE was provided to the borrower and the consummation of the loan.
  • When re-disclosure of the CD is required, Thursday, November 28, 2019 cannot be included in the three (3) business day waiting period between the date the revised CD was provided to the borrower and the consummation of the loan.

Issues related to locks should be sent via email to lockdesk@carringtonms.com.

The Definition of Goldilocks

Last Week in Review: The Definition of Goldilocks

“Looking ahead, my colleagues and I see a sustained expansion of economic activity, a strong labor market, and inflation near our symmetric 2% objective as most likely.” — Fed Chairman Jerome Powell, 11/13/2019

This quote from our Fed Chair on Capitol Hill this past week was the definition of a “Goldilocks Economy” and reaffirmed the markets that there is no recession in sight!

Thanks to this strong economic backdrop, Mr. Powell also said it’s highly unlikely the Fed will cut rates again in December. Remember, Fed rate cuts don’t affect home loan rates, so don’t expect a sharp uptick in mortgage rates. Why?

As the Fed’s quote states, inflation remains low and near the Fed’s target. If inflation moves higher, home loan rates move higher. The opposite is also true.

Bottom line: home loan rates improved from the worst levels of the week and head into mid-November still hovering near three-year lows. What an opportunity when coupled with the Goldilocks backdrop.

New Carrington Flexible Advantage Plus 85% Expanded Cash-Out LTV Enhancement

Overview

Effective November 14, 2019, Carrington Mortgage Services, LLC (CMS) is pleased to introduce a new 85% Expanded Cash-Out LTV option for the Carrington Flexible Advantage Plus program.

The 85% Expanded Cash-Out LTV option is perfect for borrowers looking to pull out cash, consolidate debt, pay for college tuition, home improvements, etc.  We are excited to offer a product that allows creditworthy borrowers the ability to access higher loan to values with a 620 minimum FICO; especially when many other lenders have recently pulled back to 80% LTV.

Eligibility Requirements for LTVs 80.01-85% and FICOs 620-679

  • Applies to Carrington Flexible Advantage Plus only
  • Full Documentation
  • Detached Single Family Residence and Detached PUD Only (No Condos)
  • Maximum 45% DTI
  • Minimum Loan Amount = $100,000
  • Maximum Loan Amount = $600,000
  • Maximum Cash-in-Hand to borrower = $50,000

Note: All payoffs, which are excluded from the Cash-in-Hand limit must be reflected on the Closing Disclosure and paid off through closing.  Payoffs include, but are not limited to, IRS debt, tax liens, business debt, or paying off a spouse or partner to come off title.

  • Residual Income = $3000 plus $150 per dependent

Contact your Account Executive for details.

Resources

Refer to the Carrington Flexible Advantage Plus Program Matrix for additional information.

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